Request for Research on Steinway by Scholars

The wealth of information on the Steinway Settlement gleamed by the interns is made available to scholars:

Scholar #1 Testimony: Assistant Professor, Queens College-CUNY, History Department

I am a historian of greater New York, but also environmental, urban, and city planning history. I am working on a manuscript that has a chapter that explores early city planning in the Steinway neighborhood. As you know, there is a limited number of researchers/archivists/historians who work on Queens.

I was hired specifically to teach NYC and Queens history. Rather than repeat the story of Manhattan-based power brokers and professional planners, I re-orientated the story around the city’s periphery, and look at non-professionals and vernacular planning as well as the rise of professional planners/park design. This has been a very fulfilling research project, and has only been possible because of the much localized collections of the region’s town archives/historical societies.

I am grateful that organizations like yours exist to preserve this history. You have such a wonderful collection; it was wonderful to get to see it, and to talk more about my research on the Steinway Settlement. I appreciate all the insight you shared about the settlement and your experiences with Henry Steinway. This will be of great use to my research.

Scholar #2 Testimony: Assistant Professor, Art & Music Department, Bronx Community College

I am interested in exploring the architectural style of the early Steinway houses, comparing them to 19th century treatises on architecture and to other urban housing developments. I’m also interested in studying how housing adapts over time to the surrounding community. I imagine working this into at least one article-length piece, in which case I could certainly use the resources the GAHS has available. Thanks for sharing this information.

Last time we spoke, I mentioned that I had uncovered the names of a few architects that built houses in Steinway Village, one, Nicholas Gillesheimer, worked for the firm of Calvert Vaux, best known for his work designing Central Park along with Frederick Olmstead.